Tag Archives: Twitch

Kresh and Kern’s brand new disaster through Eorzea. Final Fantasy XIV Part 2: A Misadventure Reborn

Hey all, it’s Kern here. Kresh and I have been playing Final Fantasy XIV on our live streams. This is part 2 of our level grinds, joined by our friends for havoc and good time. Lots of laughter in this live stream.

In this particular stream we continue where we last left off. Before the stream, Kresh picked up a tank job and got it to the same level we ended off at. We want to be sure to stay around the same basic exp and level range if we can. From now on Kresh is playing a tank and I’m still playing a healer.

We finally escaped the low level zone of Gridania and the shrouds of forests that surround it… for now at least. We do 3 of the story related dungeons this time around and amass a few levels while we’re at it.

You should subscribe to our twitch so you can watch our streaming content live, but you can find the playlists on our Twitch and our YouTube channels as well.

Kresh and Kern’s brand new disaster through Eorzea: Final Fantasy XIV part 2: A Misadventure Reborn

You’ll want to follow our twitch if you want to see things live when they happen.

After a few story line related missions we entered Sastasha, a level 15 dungeon that keeps the training wheels on more or less. It’s pirate themed. I was massively under geared at the time, since due to the streamlined leveling process I thought I’d hit 20 before we entered and I’d be allowed to equip the gear I’d purchased to prepare for that.

Almost immediately after that, it was time for The Tam-Tara Deepcroft a level 16 dungeon all about a subterranean crypt used as a resting place for rulers and nobles of Eorzea. Outside of a few rusty pulls, it goes fairly well enough.

Once we escaped that, we did more story missions. Before we knew it, were ready for the aptly named quest “Copper Hell” and therefore entered the next instance, Copperbell Mines. This is a level 17 dungeon that has been made much easier since the enemies have been weakened and the developers made the area easier. I still personally hate it though.

All in all, it was a good live stream and we put a nice dent into the three hours we played. We didn’t get to do more gaming over the weekend because Kresh went away on holiday, but once she returns we’ll be back with more misadventures for sure. See you next time.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you next time.

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You can help support us through PayPal or Patreon.

Meanwhile, check out some of our other great content below. You can also find more information about supporting us at the bottom of this post.

Spyro 2: Ripto’s Rage – Reignited (Longplay)

Hey everyone, it’s Kern here, back with another long-play from our YouTube channel. Today the name of the game is Spyro 2: Ripto’s Rage from the Reignited trilogy of games.

Spyro the Dragon – Long Play

This trilogy is a remastering of the original Spyro trilogy developed by Insomniac Games. The original three games ran from the years 1998 to 2000. These games are platformers featuring the protagonist, Spyro. He’s a young purple dragon with a little bit of an attitude, and a flair for breathing fire, and flying around.

As you may recall, we’ve already done the first game on our channel in a long-play format. As we last left our titular hero, he rescued his friends and reclaimed the dragon’s treasure, all while facing down the evil nemesis of the game, Gnasty Gnorc.

This time, we’re facing down new villains, with a new evil plot. Ripto, along with his two minions Crush and Gulp have decided to conquer Avalar. It’s our job to stop him. We’ll see how that goes.

Spyro 2: Ripto’s Rage – Reignited (Long-Play)

Much like the first game, this one received quite the critical acclaim by gamers all around the world. This particular remake was released for the PlayStation 4 and the Xbox One on November 13, 2018. The PC and Nintendo Switch saw a release on September 3, 2019.

Spyro 2: Ripto’s Rage, is also known as Spyro 2: Gateway to Glimmer in Europe and Australia. The game was released in 1999. Like its predecessor, this is a platform title, developed by Insomniac Games and it was published by Sony Computer Entertainment for the PlayStation back in the day. This is the second game in the main series.

This game is kid friendly and therefore, great for young gamers. If you have a child that’s just starting out on platforming titles, this is a good game to pick. Spyro is the spunky dragon we all know and love, and the enemies are the goofy sort. You’ll find a lot of family fun here to go around.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you next time.

Click to Donate

You can help support us through PayPal or Patreon.

Meanwhile, check out some of our other great content below. You can also find more information about supporting us at the bottom of this post.

With your contributions, you make our efforts possible. Thank you for supporting our content. Patreon supporters receive access into our official Discord server, and a few other perks depending on the tier. If you don’t care for Patreon, and don’t care about perks, you can always support us through PayPal too… links below.

Those who join via Patreon get special perks, such as extra content, quicker updates, and more.

Click to Donate

To Our Supporters

Thank you for helping us to enrich our content.

Patreon Supporters:
($3) Little Ferrets: None
($5) Demented Minions: Francis Murphy and Andrew Wheal.
($7) Fandom Ferret: None
($14) True Blue Ferret: None.
($25) Premium Ferret: None.
($50) Round Table Ferret/Fluffy Ferret: Josh Sayer

Kresh and Kern’s brand new disaster through Eorzea: Final Fantasy XIV part 1: A Misadventure Reborn

Hey all, it’s Kern here. As I’ve said, Kresh and I have been planning to do Final Fantasy XIV streams from level one all the way through. We did our first stream on Saturday.

Also, I want to give a quick shout-out to our newest Patron, Bryan BSB. Thanks for your support man, you’re awesome!

Saturday we began our new characters for the live stream and began the story quests. We reached level seventeen in the level grind so far. Kresh was on her archer and I was on my conjurer. Since the game has been around a while, quests have been streamlined to better fit the leveling model.

In all honesty, you should subscribe to our twitch so you can watch our streaming content live, but you can find the video for Saturday’s stream here: https://www.twitch.tv/videos/1471163476

Since it was the first day leveling upon these characters, we were basically just speeding through early content and goofing around with a friend from our free company aptly named, you guessed it, Demented Ferrets.

I have two streaming characters, Kresh has one. You can find us on the Phoenix server, so if you play over there give us a wave. If you see us online, that’s us live streaming. My streaming characters are Kern Alty (solo streaming) and Kernook Cadfan (static character with Kresh). Kresh has named her character Kresh Aranara (streaming and static character with me).

Kresh and Kern’s brand new disaster through Eorzea: Final Fantasy XIV part 1: A Misadventure Reborn

You’ll want to follow our twitch if you want to see things live when they happen.

We had to start in Gridania, but Kresh will be switching jobs to a tank soon enough. Likely a warrior or a paladin. This is fine and dandy, as we want to play a healer and tank combo.

As for why we didn’t start in a different city, I made a blog post all about the largest issue you may run into regarding that; starting cities. You’ll want to give that a read if you care about starting city kerfuffles. If not, no big deal.

Ultimately we plan to stream FFXIV at least once a week, though Kresh will be going on vacation soon for a short time, so you’ll be stuck with a bit of solo streaming content for a while as of the 7th of May for a week or two.

I’ll be sure to stream on my solo character though.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you next time.

Click to Donate

You can help support us through PayPal or Patreon.

Meanwhile, check out some of our other great content below. You can also find more information about supporting us at the bottom of this post.

With your contributions, you make our efforts possible. Thank you for supporting our content. Patreon supporters receive access into our official Discord server, and a few other perks depending on the tier. If you don’t care for Patreon, and don’t care about perks, you can always support us through PayPal too… links below.

Those who join via Patreon get special perks, such as extra content, quicker updates, and more.

Click to Donate

To Our Supporters

Thank you for helping us to enrich our content.

Patreon Supporters:
($3) Little Ferrets: None
($5) Demented Minions: Francis Murphy and Andrew Wheal.
($7) Fandom Ferret: None
($14) True Blue Ferret: Bryan BSB.
($25) Premium Ferret: None.
($50) Round Table Ferret/Fluffy Ferret: Josh Sayer

Let’s Talk Gaming: Things Final Fantasy XIV Did Wrong – Starting Cities

Before I begin, let me preface this by saying that I think Final Fantasy XIV does a lot of things correctly when it comes to being a very solid MMORPG. I enjoy the game a lot, and I’ve spent plenty of time (and subscription money) to frolic around in Eorzea. What’s Eorzea you ask? Well, it’s the fictional world Final Fantasy XIV is set within.

A bit of backstory seems prudent. I began playing Final Fantasy XI back when it first released in the USA in the early 2000’s. I played the original Final Fantasy XIV before Square Enix tossed aside the project and went back to the drawing board (more on that game and its countless failings in a separate post). That’ll be a rabbit hole if I ever decide to explain that mess.

Anyway, when the game later released anew under the name “A Realm Reborn” I claimed my free copy offered to those of us who had played on the old game for so long and dove headfirst into my favorite type of MMORPG, the Final Fantasy kind.

For years though, I’ve always thought that Final Fantasy XIV made a few decisions that weren’t exactly wise for gamers like myself, coming from other MMORPG’s with the intent to “static” with other players.

What is a “static” you ask? Well, that’s simple, it’s when you play a game only with a select few people, and you do so regularly. In FFXI, static parties were a commonality among close friends. Many MMORPG’s seem to put systems into place that destroy the “static mindset” and considering that FFXI thrived on that style of gameplay, you can guess how I might feel about that…

Generally speaking, I’m not too happy at all with the concept.

While Final Fantasy XIV has plenty to praise, the story line particularly, it also has one thing I absolutely despise… well, it has a few things I despise, but none more so than they way they start you in a city based on what job you plan to level, rather than where you’d LIKE to start.

Say for example, what’s going on for Kresh and I currently as we plan a stream day around Final Fantasy XIV (yes, we both like the game that much, that we’re going to stream it regularly soon). There’s just one problem, I plan to level WHM (White Mage, a healer for the uninitiated). Kresh plans to level a tank… however, there are no tank jobs that start in Gridania, meaning Kresh would have to start elsewhere.

See what I mean?

It kind of defeats the purpose of friends starting off together on new characters. If don’t start there, I would need to wait to level the job required to unlock WHM, however, if we don’t start in the city Kresh where Kresh can get a tanking job, then it makes for the same problem in reverse. This is a confine of the game directly, and it makes for something of problem that is strangely antiquated despite the fact that the much older MMORPG (FFXI) never had this problem if the first place. Jobs were not implemented in this way.

Final Fantasy XI never had any such issue, because you could choose your job and your starting location. It wasn’t a lose-lose situation. It didn’t have to be. Final Fantasy XIV should have followed suit in my personal opinion, because games that discourage friends to play together based on something as arbitrary as starting cities loses focus on what an MMORPG truly is.

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Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game… that’s what MMORPG stands for, and it should be at the core of the valuable systems indicative of the gameplay experience.

In this particular aspect, and a few others, Final Fantasy XIV failed that concept. The starting cities based upon your job within the game is a key point to make about this.

Now, to be clear World of Warcraft had a similar ideology at one point. It was irksome there as well, particularly during the dark ages when being a druid forced you onto starting as either a Tauren or a Night Elf. However, at least in World of Warcraft that made sense within the wider lore and universe. Final Fantasy XIV has no set player-verses-player standard the way that World of Warcraft did, nor, longstanding lore to draw from. Therefore, I find the “lore” argument a harder one to make or even defend for Final Fantasy XIV.

Now, to be clear, in Final Fantasy XIV this really is just a minor annoyance at best, as you can change your job at whim… however, that’s kind of the point. In World of Warcraft, you couldn’t do that. If you picked say… a warrior for example, then that’s what you were… a warrior… you couldn’t suddenly change your job to a mage or or a priest just because you felt like it. You had to start another character and begin the grind again.

In Final Fantasy XI and in Final Fantasy XIV you can level all of the jobs on one single character, with no need to make a second or a third. With this ideology in mind, surely you can see how it might be just a little reductive and in some ways flat out idiotic to demand a starting location based on your starting job alone.

Some games pull off that sort of limitation more believably than others, but in my personal opinion, Final Fantasy XIV just isn’t one of them… you may actually like this system the way it is, and if you do, that’s fine too. This, to me, is just a personal annoyance, but one that sticks out so perniciously as one very bad idea, and one that just didn’t have any real need to be implemented in the first place.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you next time.

Click to Donate

You can help support us through PayPal or Patreon.

Meanwhile, check out some of our other great content below. You can also find more information about supporting us at the bottom of this post.

With your contributions, you make our efforts possible. Thank you for supporting our content. Patreon supporters receive access into our official Discord server, and a few other perks depending on the tier. If you don’t care for Patreon, and don’t care about perks, you can always support us through PayPal too… links below.

Those who join via Patreon get special perks, such as extra content, quicker updates, and more.

Click to Donate

To Our Supporters

Thank you for helping us to enrich our content.

Patreon Supporters:
($3) Little Ferrets: None
($5) Demented Minions: Francis Murphy and Andrew Wheal.
($7) Fandom Ferret: None
($14) True Blue Ferret: None.
($25) Premium Ferret: None.
($50) Round Table Ferret/Fluffy Ferret: Josh Sayer

Kresh Plays: Stranger of Paradise Final Fantasy Origin

Hey everyone, it’s Kern here. This week Kresh finished playing “Stranger of Paradise Final Fantasy Origin” over on our Twitch channel.

We take a lot of pot shots at the game for its lack of story telling, but according to Kresh the gameplay is quite fun, and in my opinion it’s pretty enjoyable to watch. You an check out the full play through below.

Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin tends to have darker themes than its other counterparts. This is an action focused role-playing game developed by Team Ninja, and published by Square Enix. The game stands as an alternate universe prequel of the original Final Fantasy that released back in December of 1987.

The story line follows a cast of characters brought into a fantasy world to face down something known as “chaos” and features something of a twist for an ending. Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin was released in March 2022 for plenty of platforms. You can play it on WindowsPlayStation 4, PlayStation 5 and the Xbox One. In a small way it’s kind of like the Dark Souls of Final Fantasy games, with a darker feel to the story. There’s some real grit here, and it’s worth at least a watch, if not a play-through of your own.

As always beyond the playlist there’s more information about the game below. We hope you enjoy it!

Kresh Plays: Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin

Want to watch the full playlist on YouTube instead? Click here.

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

Part 6 (Final)

As I said above, Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin is an action focused role-playing game. That means it’s a little more fast paced than your typical fantasy style story. There is fall damage too, a fact we learned much too late and hilarity ensued.

In any case, players will take on the role of our main protagonist, Jack. You’ll be exploring environments and fighting monsters and visiting locations based upon the main titles of the Final Fantasy series. From the ever famous Tonberries and Crawlers, to spiders and bats if you’ve played Final Fantasy games before the callbacks are endless. You’ll traverse new areas inspired by the series classics and there’s a little something for everyone.

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Combat takes place in real-time, with Jack being able to switch between jobs. Once again, if you’re a Final Fantasy fan, there’s a lot to like here. For those unaware, though, some jobs do physical damage. Others heal or do magical attacks. You can also do a finishing move that violently and crystallizes the enemy. Doing that causes them to explode with volatile intent, but its worth doing.

The boss fights are pretty decent, Team Ninja did a very good job subverting my personal expectations. As a long time Final Fantasy fan myself, I’d expect to see one area boss only to find out that Kresh would be facing down something entirely different.

I made a post earlier about the “bad writing” regarding the game. I do still stick by that. The story line has a lot of lazy or skipped-over elements. More on that in the blog post. The main takeaway is that if you’re expecting a Final Fantasy level epic saga, you won’t find it here.

According to Kresh the gameplay is solid and I enjoyed watching her play it. As much as I give it beef for its bad story telling, it’s not that awful. Actually, in the last hour and a half or two, the game really ramps up and gets very good in the story telling department.

I do think that ultimately if you’re looking for an action packed adventure you’ll probably find it here. There’s a lot of really neat little additions, cool nods to the wider series, and revisiting some of those old locations in a new light is pretty nice.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you next time.

Click to Donate

You can help support us through PayPal or Patreon.

Meanwhile, check out some of our other great content below. You can also find more information about supporting us at the bottom of this post.

With your contributions, you make our efforts possible. Thank you for supporting our content. Patreon supporters receive access into our official Discord server, and a few other perks depending on the tier. If you don’t care for Patreon, and don’t care about perks, you can always support us through PayPal too… links below.

Those who join via Patreon get special perks, such as extra content, quicker updates, and more.

Click to Donate

To Our Supporters

Thank you for helping us to enrich our content.

Patreon Supporters:
($3) Little Ferrets: None
($5) Demented Minions: Francis Murphy and Andrew Wheal.
($7) Fandom Ferret: None
($14) True Blue Ferret: None.
($25) Premium Ferret: None.
($50) Round Table Ferret/Fluffy Ferret: Josh Sayer

The “Bad Writing” of Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin

To start with, we’ve all heard that excuse time and time again from fandom. In our favorite shows, movies, books and other media, there’s always someone who shouts two simple words into the void; “bad writing!”. They shout this before leaving the matter at that.

I’ve seen messy writing in plenty of pieces of media, I’ve seen poorly executed writing even beyond that. However, bad writing is an outlier in such a drastic way that it actually annoys me to hear this turn of phrase more often than not…

Typically a person says this if they don’t agree with a narrative decision within the media presented to them. There’s plenty of discourse to be had about how something could have been done better, sure enough. No story is flawless, after all.

In point of fact, and I say this very adamantly, I tend to find that the “bad writing” argument crops up more often when a person can’t pin down why they dislike the writing so much. That’s why I’m very unrepentant when I say that the “bad writing” argument is a misnomer for greater prevailing issues.

The issue itself could be many things. Perhaps a personal chord was plucked to make someone feel that way. A story could in fact have “bad” moments of “writing” within the material to upset a person. To someone directly and pointedly offended, “bad writing” might be a solid critique of the way a certain theme was handled… I see that argument a lot in the RWBY fandom. Certain subject matters aren’t always handled with care and concern, so that’s why the critique crops up… but really, in that example, the writing isn’t “bad” per-say, just poorly executed.

There are occasions that it could just be “bad writing” though, truth be told, because there are very rare circumstances when what lies before you is actually little more than a pile of irredeemable drivel. The issue is, that’s an oddity, not a rule… but I have located an oddity recently.

As a gamer, I’ve seen poorly contrived plot elements take a back seat for the sake of bombastic gameplay more times than not. In gaming, this is sometimes a serviceable tactic, but not always… a most recent example comes to mind in Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin. You can watch our gameplay of that over on our Twitch channel…

What makes writing bad, generally comes down to how core issues present the themes in the game. To another point, I find the characters themselves generally unlikable. I find this to be the main problem in Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin.

To be pointedly clear though, this really only applies to the beginning and middle of the game. The last hour and a half, two things happen. Firstly, the cut scenes vastly improve. Secondly, the story actually gets VERY, VERY good!

However, the very good part only applies to the latter section of the game, not everything preceding it, and that’s the reason I’m using it as an example today.

In the earliest parts of the game the plot line often comes down to finding a way to cram the word “Chaos” into as much of the dialogue as humanly possible… in some cases, the story itself jumps the shark by doing a fast-forward to skip an event or two that was obviously deemed required by the writing staff.

Let me walk you through why this is “bad writing” directly on its face. Three guys meet, and immediately after introducing themselves, we get a “bro-fist” as they decide to join together. Then, directly after the very questionable act of deciding to become best buddies, we get two throw away paragraphs about what happens after, with no context or plot driven narrative to fall back upon.

That problem is, that jump in content reduces down to explaining the events that took place, without player related input, or even screen splash showing the event. It’s just a black background with white colored words explaining what players should have gotten to experience…

That’s it, just those two plain black images about visiting with the king, who refuses to allow them to take on their intended mission. Instead, they spend weeks together slaying monsters, and that’s it… literally, that’s all you get before the screen fades to black.

Why were they refused? Why do these supposed crystals look like giant cockroach turds? Why are these characters joining forces simply because the crystals can “sense each other” as one of the characters says they can? Why, amid what amounts to be a throw-away paragraph does it seem like a total and complete afterthought?

It feels like either pure laziness, or a decision compounded by some freakish lack of planning, or a budget crisis. Bad design, no cookie for you. Either way, the story goes on from there… a game shouldn’t feel that way, if it could in any way be avoided.

As a player, you return to these characters, who by now know each other, although we the players still know nothing of them. They’re all sitting upon a boat, complaining about how bored they are, and how they want to do the job they came for already, defeating “Chaos”.

We still don’t have a “why” for any of the above that feels reasonable, and you’d be correct to call that “messy writing” by video game standards. You’d be fair to call it lazy in general. In that singular case, where neither gameplay nor firm story-line exists yet, you could go so far as to call it bad writing. You’d even be right to do so… because at this point, we know next to nothing about these characters, or their deeper motivations.

I don’t often care much for the “show, don’t tell” rule in writing. There are times you do have to “tell” an off-screen plot element or two instead of showcasing it… but this use of “telling” is much too flagrant here. It is bad writing, firm and flat out… that’s why I fall to Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin as my foremost example of “bad writing”, because frankly, there was just no excuse.

As I said before though, in gaming, a good story-line typically takes a back seat to bombastic gameplay. To be honest, that game is very bombastic, over the top in the best of times.

According to Kresh, who is playing the game on the stream, it’s also pretty fun on occasion. Perhaps that’s a saving grace, but the story-line and the occasional direct lack of it, does hinder the game too.

I cannot personally comment on how “fun” it is to play. I can only speak upon the theatricality of the combat itself. However, I’ll say this, you’d be hard pressed to call the gameplay itself boring, as even your small, typically encountered leveling fodder have a habit to explode in bright, if ominous colors.

This tends to leave a crystalline residue of their exploded corpses in their wake… and frankly, as I said, it is bombastic. I don’t think you could call it brilliant, or even tangentially metaphorical to the plot-line at all. It has ties to the deeper themes, sure enough… but it doesn’t lend to the world building in a way that feels satisfactory. It just looks cool.

All-in-all if you need a very recent example of bad writing in game design, look no further than Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin. Does it entirely ruin the game? No, not exactly. It’s still a serviceable gameplay experience. It’s interesting enough for me to watch, and for Kresh to play… so there is that at least. That said, if you want a solid narrative, this isn’t the Final Fantasy title for you… far from it.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you next time.

Click to Donate

You can help support us through PayPal or Patreon.

Meanwhile, check out some of our other great content below. You can also find more information about supporting us at the bottom of this post.

With your contributions, you make our efforts possible. Thank you for supporting our content. Patreon supporters receive access into our official Discord server, and a few other perks depending on the tier. If you don’t care for Patreon, and don’t care about perks, you can always support us through PayPal too… links below.

Those who join via Patreon get special perks, such as extra content, quicker updates, early fiction chapters and more.

Click to Donate

To Our Supporters

Thank you for helping us to enrich our content.

Patreon Supporters:
($3) Little Ferrets: None
($5) Demented Minions: Francis Murphy and Andrew Wheal.
($7) Fandom Ferret: None
($14) True Blue Ferret: None.
($25) Premium Ferret: None.
($50) Round Table Ferret/Fluffy Ferret: Josh Sayer

Kern Plays: “Dear Esther: Landmark Edition”

Hey guys, it’s Kern here with a little bit of gameplay. Dear Esther is basically a walking simulator with a heavily laced narrative focus. Due to that I won’t be diving too deep on this one, there isn’t much to explain.

Dear Esther is a first person point-of-view exploration first and foremost. Although you might also coin it an adventure game, I’m hesitant to do that. There’s really no enemies or prevailing threats. All that you’ll find here is a riveting story… 

Kern Plays: Dear Esther

More Information

Dear Esther was developed by The Chinese Room for the PC, PlayStation 4 and the Xbox One. The game was first released in 2008 as a free to play model. Later on, the game was entirely redeveloped for a commercial release in 2012.

As I said above, the game features very minimal gameplay at best, which is why it is often called a “walking simulator” a phrase you generally either love or hate as a gamer.

Personally, I think games like these have their own value, particularly if well written prose is the goal ambition of the design from the start. Dear Esther showcases this perfectly. Really, you only have one main objective here; explore the island the narrator stands upon. While you explore around and get your bearings, a troubled man explains his turmoil and reads a series of letters to his beloved, yet deceased, wife. Details of her death are slowly revealed as you explore around the island.

That’s about it… no really… that’s the basics of the game.

It is noteworthy to state that despite the minimalist style and gameplay, the game was critically acclaimed for the story it tells. I wouldn’t go so far as to call it horror, but if you are the imaginative sort, it can be a bit unsettling.

When 2017 came around, an updated version known as the Dear Esther: Landmark Edition was released, based on the Unity engine. That’s the one I’m playing in the video.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at it’s finest, and level grinds are par for the course. ..

With your contributions, you make our efforts possible. Thank you for supporting our content. Patreon supporters receive access into our official Discord server, and a few other perks depending on the tier. If you don’t care for Patreon, and don’t care about perks, you can always support us through PayPal too… links below.

Those who join via Patreon get special perks, such as extra content, quicker updates, early fiction chapters and more.

Click to Donate

To Our Supporters

Thank you for helping us to enrich our content.

Patreon Supporters:
($3) Little Ferrets: None
($5) Demented Minions: Francis Murphy and Andrew Wheal.
($7) Fandom Ferret: None
($14) True Blue Ferret: None.
($25) Premium Ferret: None.
($50) Round Table Ferret/Fluffy Ferret: Josh Sayer

Human-Robot

Hello everyone it’s Demented Ferrets resident artist, Ruka. Welcome back to another “Universal Language of Art” post.

ART! The one thing most parents and media tell us to stay far away from “It doesn’t pay the bills!” they say, yet it is involved in 100% of the things we consume day in and day out! So let’s talk about it.

Art comes in many forms, sometimes in the form of photographs, while other times it could be a brush covering a canvas with color, bodies swaying to a tune, among many others, art is a wide range of human activities. At its core, art is fueled by imagination, aimed for the purpose of self-expression.

Human-robot by Rukangle

What is art? Art is the expression or application of human creative skill and imagination, typically in a visual form such as painting or sculpture, producing works to be appreciated primarily for their beauty or emotional power. When we think of art, most of the time our minds go to the famous works of art like; The Monalisa by DaVinci, The Starry Night by Vincent van Gogh, Girl with a Pearl Earring by Johannes Vermeer, The Great Wave of Kanagawa by Hokusai, among many others.

Speaking of artwork, what about games as a medium? That’s art too!

Do you like gameplay, come check out our Twitch channel.

Kernook, Ruka, and Kresh recently played Phasmophobia together. You should check it out.

There are a hundred other works of art in the world, they just have different names. We have the art of literature, performance, music, and many others … in a way what I’m doing right now can be considered an art form. Art can be a form of therapy for many of us, young and old alike. It can be a pass time, a passion, it can unify all of us. Art brings people together, it can lighten up a room, it can even help us learn more about ourselves.

As a society, art has been a form of communication for centuries, the early human language, pictures in a cave wall. The best-known example is the Red Hand Stencil in Maltravieso, a cave in Cáceres, Spain. Believed to be older than 64,000 years old and probably made by a Neanderthal.

Going a bit forward in time, we have the Egyptians and their hieroglyphics. Hieroglyphics are known as the formal writing system used in Ancient Egypt, they combined logographic, syllabic, and alphabetic elements, with a total of some 1,000 distinct characters. The cursive hieroglyphs were used for religious literature.

Think about this for a minute, they were using drawings as a written form of their language.

It’s fascinating to go back in time and find that just a few strokes here and there trying to mimic the world around us, to be able to communicate with one another, has evolved so much.

To me, art has no clear definition, it is really whatever you make of it. Think about it for a minute, for some stick figures is art, while for others, art has to be complicated and close to perfection and realism. Yet, for many of us, if it brings out an emotional response, it’s what we considered to be something worthwhile.

Let’s take the experience of going to a convention, it shows this in spades. Last year, there was an artist who made hand-carved signs and let me tell you they were eye-catching, 3D, and colorful and it was unique in his technique, something you don’t typically see on the convention floor. If I had a shop, I would have asked for commission and price.

“Ok, that’s easy for you to say because you can draw and take pictures and all the art things required for the site, etc… but not everyone is as lucky, to have that ability.” said someone in the crowd. Well not really, compared to other people I personally think, I suck. Why do I think this? Well because we all do, every artist that you have ever encountered has this mental setting more times than not. It takes us a long time to feel comfortable and see what we are good at, and finding our style is a constant trial and error exercise. For example, “Human-robot” here is a very small piece of my mind. It looks good, it looks clean, it might make sense maybe a bit freaky looking, but for me, it’s one of the best pieces I have and it was made in 2012, and that tells you a lot. We can go around the demented ferret’s site and find recent pieces that look cruder than “Human-robot” and some that look cleaner and up to date.

Why is this? because I’m still learning and evolving. Personally, I have problems with colors, and it will be rare to find a color piece by me, and the ferrets here are the reason I am working out of my comfort zone. When it comes to photography, it’s a moment in time that can be captured as it is. There is color but the world is the artist, I’m just the one who managed to get the moment, but in sketching, drawing, and painting it’s all up to me and it can be overwhelming.

I can talk and give y’all a basic breakdown of all the things an artist “should know” in what makes a good artist but it is all in the technical aspects of it. Things like how many elements are there in the arts? Themes that explore and create art. Patterns in art, shadowing, the color wheel, perspective, etc… just thinking about it, takes me back to the fundamentals of art.

Well, that is it for me today, I hope you enjoy this post on Universal Language of Art. If you guys find yourselves interested or curious about anything I said, please don’t hesitate to leave me a comment below.

If you like this content, please consider supporting us on Patreon, and follow us over on our Twitch channel for gaming-related content, where I make an appearance via chat, well like always, this has been Ruka of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest, and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you around! Until then please be sure to check out our other content below.

Writing Fan Fiction – Consider The Characters

Hey everyone, it’s Kern here. I’ve written a few posts about “fan fiction” before, basically centered around the impact of fandom and how to combat writers block.

These posts are not for people that want to be best selling authors. If you want to do that, you shouldn’t be writing fan fiction. They’re also not for those looking to make a quick buck, as that’s not the heart and soul of what fan fiction is. .. not to mention, that’s a questionable act besides.

No, these posts are low stress, low expectation, built around discussions based on a hobby that I care for greatly. I know many other people do too. When it comes to fan fiction, I read it, I write it and I love it.

I am such a huge supporter of fan fiction that I even choose to to read it over many best selling books. I made a blog post regarding that already. However, my view stands strong and I’m not likely to change that opinion any time soon. You can check that one out if you care to, I’ve linked it for your convenience.

To be succinct though, my preference comes down to the way the medium is handled. It isn’t perfect, far from it.

Fan fiction often lacks the punchier written format we expect from professionals, and to me that’s the main appeal. It will always be a diamond in the rough. That’s usually a good thing, as it means fans are enjoying thier ability to explore thier own creativity.

With my views of fan fiction laid bare and transparent for all to see, let’s move on to the meat and potatoes of this post. First though, I have an important question for you…

What is the one thing a good story cannot do without?

Well, there’s only one thing really… characters. Well-written, compelling characters are the single strongest asset to the fan fiction medium.

Fan fiction will inevitably be separated from other writing styles simply because the concept has already been laid out in front of you. Whatever your fandom of choice, there are already fans of it. You’ve already been given a set of predetermined parameters in which to work with. When we talk about gaming, anime, movies and television, the characters within the series are by far the bread and butter of any piece of writing.

The reason for this is because established characters we know and love are ones that we want more of. When the main series ends or takes a break, the fandom remains. It’s fun to interpret major set pieces in your own way. The characters are typically the first touch-stone fans use to do that… now clearly they aren’t the only building block of importance, but they are the one I want to look at today.

Aside from a few key examples where settings, and their obligatory set pieces become particularly noteworthy, those things will never tower over the characters themselves in a fan written work. When you boil it all down, the reason why is simple…

A story is about what happens, and the characters are who it happens to...

If characters aren’t compelling, readers just won’t give a rat’s ass what happens to them. Impeccable action sequences and mindfully placed drama doesn’t add anything if we can’t be brought to care about who those things are happening to.

No amount of skillful writing can save a story that has poorly written characters. Thankfully in the world of fan fiction, you aspiring writers out there already have a perfect template. The characters you know and already love. You’ve got the whole tool chest right in front of you. You know how they should look, you how they sound, you know their dialogue and vocal patterns.

The characters in the fandom you’re writing for have already been made. Like a child playing pretend, it’s up to you to decide how you want to play around with your imagination. There’s all kinds of ways you can do this.

You can choose to subvert what you know. I highly suggest this. Add a little flair, amplify key character traits and lessen others to background static to suit your needs in your fan fiction. Do you want to take your favorite action hero and cram him in a coffee shop? You can do that. Actually, funnily enough coffee shop fan fiction tends to be pretty popular too.

What to mix and match your favorite characters across different series, you can do that too! I’ve done that myself using Final Fantasy XI and RWBY. Both series have a lot of the same thematic elements, personal character struggles and compelling undertones to explore. These two series play off of each other particularly well for combat too.

Don’t believe me? Find a mage in a Final Fantasy game that casts “haste”, and then check out Weiss Schnee when she battles with yellow dust during Roman’s fight Atleasian Paladin in the RWBY series.

The clock Weiss makes for Blake really is a neat thing. and the skill as a dust mage plays off logic found in the mages of Final Fantasy games.

Both of these skills do the same thing. Speed up character attacks. These are two universes I absolutely love, and combining aspects of both really appealed to me. Putting aspects of both into the same fan fiction was just par for the course for me.

For my fan fiction, I chose to take Curilla V Mecru from the video game Final Fantasy XI, and place her into the RWBY universe in my fandom related writing.

Why was I compelled to do this? Easy, it’s because Curilla’s homeland of San d’Oria reminds me heavily of the kingdom of Mistral in RWBY.

This mixed with the fact that she shares so many common personality traits with Weiss Schnee and Winter Schnee of RWBY makes me wonder what these characters would be like if they could be friends (and perhaps romantic interests).

I decided to explore that, and fan fiction was my gateway through that journey.

The takeaway; the key of good characterization is to focus upon what interests you the most.

We’re likely to notice the aspects of characters that mean the most to us. Perhaps it’s their fighting style, their personality, or maybe it’s just the way they chose to dress. There are always aspects we, as fans, cling onto. Traits we love and tidbits we’re drawn to. However, it’s not just what we love about the characters that matters. It’s typically a well placed character flaw that seems the most interesting to explore.

Ultimately we won’t be brought to love every single thing about our favorite character. To be sure, if there isn’t a flaw someplace… well, that’s a huge issue and it is bad writing. You can still love a flaw while respecting that it is a flaw, though. When writing, play with those flaws and your readers will thank you.

At the end of the day fan fiction thrives not on the story you craft, but the interesting dynamics of the characters and world you showcase through your own eyes.

This has been Kernook of the Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at it’s finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you next time. Meanwhile, check out some of our other great content below. Be sure to join us over on Patreon to support more content like this. Also, we have a Twitch channel for gaming, come check us out!

To Our Supporters: Thank You!

With your contributions, you make our efforts possible. Thank you for supporting our content. Patreon supporters receive access into our official Discord server, and a few other perks depending on the tier.

There is a $1 tier, perfect for blog readers, so don’t hesitate. Join today!

Patreon Supporters

At the time of this post there are 2 supporters of our content, in the “Demented Minion” tier and 1 in the “Fluffy Ferret” tier.

($1) Little Ferrets: None
($3) Fandom Ferret: None
($5) Demented Minions: Francis Murphy and Andrew Wheal.
($10) True Blue Ferret: None.
($25) Premium Ferret: None.
($50) Round Table Ferret/Fluffy Ferret: Josh Sayer

Kresh Plays: Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex Strikes Back

Hey everyone, it’s Kern here. Awhile back, Kresh completed Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex Strikes Back (The N. Sane Trilogy version). Below is the archived footage and a bit about the game.

Kresh completed this game on a live stream March of 2021, and you can find our live stream channel over on Twitch. If you like to watch live streams, come check us out when you’ve got some free time. Currently we stream two days a week, and run archived footage on the Saturdays. Be sure to follow our Twitch for more information, and to be updated when we go live.

If you’re a monthly subscriber to our Twitch channel (any tier) you also get access to our official Discord server as well.

Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex Strikes Back

Part 1:

Part 2:

Part 3:

For those of you who want a bit more information, let’s just gloss over some of the basics. This is your stereotypical 3D platformer of the late 90’s early 00’s era. Although the remastered version of the game lives up well to its predecessor, it can still be a tad clunky from time to time. Then again, you come to expect that from a game like this.

In general, Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex Strikes Back is a family friendly title as most platformers tend to be, (although when it comes to commentary, Kresh and I certainly aren’t since we swear so much). If you pick this game up for your household it shouldn’t disrupt too many sensibilities.

The game originally came out in 1997 for the PlayStation. It’s the sequel to Crash Bandicoot, a game that came out in 1996. The series is developed by Naughty Dog and published by Sony Computer Entertainment.

In 2017 the game was re-released as part of the  Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy. Those of you who’ve played a platformer like this know what you’re in for. These platformers were known to be a bit difficult and this game lives up to expectation on that front.

We’ve got a blog post and play-through of the first game in the series that you can find below. You may want to check it out first if you’ve never seen a Crash Bandicoot game before, although I’m sure that’s pretty unlikely. Anyway, if that interests, you, you can find the link to that post, and the gameplay footage below.

For returners of the series, it’s back to the standard formula, more or less. There’s stages to beat, crystals to collect, boxes to smash and the fictional “Wumpa Fruit” to collect. Like always, you’ll gain extra lives when you collect enough of them. Trust me, you’re going to need them.

You play as Crash Bandicoot, a goofy protagonist with an adventuresome spirit. Crash once again is being manipulated by the (hilarious) evil villain named Doctor Neo Cortex. The crystals you need to collect are scattered between 25 different levels. Every now and then, you’ll encounter a boss battle.

Your usual foes are back with a vengeance he demented Ripper Roo, the Komodo Brothers and the ravenous Tiny Tiger make an appearance. Of course, once you collect all of the crystals, you’ll also face down Doctor Neo Cortex himself.

Nitro boxes make their first appearance in this game, and they can act both as boss mechanics and little green boxes of doom scattered around the stages. No, really, these are boxes you don’t want to touch or try to smash. They’ll explode on contact, There’s only three levels that they don’t show up in at all; The Pits, Totally Bear and the Intro, which acts as a game tutorial.

All in all, Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex Strikes Back is a solid game throughout. It has a decent story-line, and although Kresh and I absolutely suck at platfomer style games, we both agree this is one you should try if you’re looking for something to play.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll catch you next time… meanwhile, check out our other great content below.

To Our Supporters: Thank You!

With your contributions, you make our efforts possible. Thank you for supporting our content. Patreon supporters receive access into our official Discord server, and a few other perks depending on the tier.

There is a $1 tier, perfect for blog readers, so don’t hesitate. Join today!

Patreon Supporters

At the time of this post there are 3 supporters of our content, currently all of them are in the “Demented Minion” tier.

($1) Little Ferrets: None
($3) Fandom Ferret: None
($5) Demented Minions: Francis Murphy, Josh Sayer, and Andrew Wheal.
($10) True Blue Ferret: None.
($25) Premium Ferret: None.
($50) Round Table Ferret: None.