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Gameplay: Resident Evil 3 Nemesis 

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Hey everyone, it’s Kernook here. Today I’m bringing to you another gameplay post. This time we’re diving deep into the realm of survival horror with Resident Evil 3: Nemesis. This particular play-through was done using the PC port of the game that came out on 2000. Although, it should be noted that the original game was released back on the PlayStation back in 1999.

At the start of the game, series mainstay Jill Valentine recounts the events of the first game which was Resident Evil (1996). This was also the first time she appeared as a playable character.

If you haven’t seen the other gameplay and reviews that we’ve covered for the Resident Evil series up to this point, you can find them here: https://dementedferrets.com/resident-evil-gameplay-and-reviews/

Resident Evil 3: Nemesis PC Longplay

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As Jill explains, when the team returned to report what they’d seen at the mansion, the truth wasn’t received well. Due to the grievous mishandling of information, and conspiratorial cover-ups thanks to the jerks at Umbrella, she’s in danger once again. The dangerous T-virus has spread now, and it runs rampant in the heart of the city. Now she must survive the hordes of zombies all over again.

Umbrella wasn’t going to go down without a fight. They had a new master plan. The pharmaceutical company gone wrong unleashes a new bio-weapon they’ve been working on. This one is intelligent and deadly. Releasing it into the city streets, they’ve given this abomination one single mission. To eradicate remaining S.T.A.R.S. team members, and this creature will prove to be Jill’s most dangerous opponent yet.

This is without a doubt my favorite game of the older generation. I cover more about my love for this particular title in my review of it. If you want more information about it, you should check there.

In short, if you’ve played a Resident Evil game from this older era then you know just about what to expect here.

There is one thing I should mention though. I covered this in my review of the game as well, but Resident Evil 3: Nemesis makes the entire Resident Evil lore a bit messy thematically. Some parts take place before the events of Resident Evil 2. Meanwhile, others take place during the events of the second game, and some take place after the events of it.

This makes the game stand as a strange narrative window into almost all of the early Resident Evil plot lines. This game also features branching narratives and choices that will determine the path you take in the game. While this offers gamers a chance to replay the game, you can’t argue that it does make the lore of the wider universe just a little bit confusing from a timeline perspective.

For the average gamer though, this really shouldn’t be too big of an issue, and you’ll likely enjoy the game if you’re already a fan of the franchise.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you next time.

With your contributions, you make our efforts possible. Thank you for supporting our content. Patreon supporters receive access into our official Discord server, and a few other perks depending on the tier. If you don’t care for Patreon, and don’t care about perks, you can always support us through PayPal too… links below.

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Kresh and Kern’s brand new disaster through Eorzea. Final Fantasy XIV Part 2: A Misadventure Reborn

Hey all, it’s Kern here. Kresh and I have been playing Final Fantasy XIV on our live streams. This is part 2 of our level grinds, joined by our friends for havoc and good time. Lots of laughter in this live stream.

In this particular stream we continue where we last left off. Before the stream, Kresh picked up a tank job and got it to the same level we ended off at. We want to be sure to stay around the same basic exp and level range if we can. From now on Kresh is playing a tank and I’m still playing a healer.

We finally escaped the low level zone of Gridania and the shrouds of forests that surround it… for now at least. We do 3 of the story related dungeons this time around and amass a few levels while we’re at it.

You should subscribe to our twitch so you can watch our streaming content live, but you can find the playlists on our Twitch and our YouTube channels as well.

Kresh and Kern’s brand new disaster through Eorzea: Final Fantasy XIV part 2: A Misadventure Reborn

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After a few story line related missions we entered Sastasha, a level 15 dungeon that keeps the training wheels on more or less. It’s pirate themed. I was massively under geared at the time, since due to the streamlined leveling process I thought I’d hit 20 before we entered and I’d be allowed to equip the gear I’d purchased to prepare for that.

Almost immediately after that, it was time for The Tam-Tara Deepcroft a level 16 dungeon all about a subterranean crypt used as a resting place for rulers and nobles of Eorzea. Outside of a few rusty pulls, it goes fairly well enough.

Once we escaped that, we did more story missions. Before we knew it, were ready for the aptly named quest “Copper Hell” and therefore entered the next instance, Copperbell Mines. This is a level 17 dungeon that has been made much easier since the enemies have been weakened and the developers made the area easier. I still personally hate it though.

All in all, it was a good live stream and we put a nice dent into the three hours we played. We didn’t get to do more gaming over the weekend because Kresh went away on holiday, but once she returns we’ll be back with more misadventures for sure. See you next time.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you next time.

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Kresh Plays: Stranger of Paradise Final Fantasy Origin

Hey everyone, it’s Kern here. This week Kresh finished playing “Stranger of Paradise Final Fantasy Origin” over on our Twitch channel.

We take a lot of pot shots at the game for its lack of story telling, but according to Kresh the gameplay is quite fun, and in my opinion it’s pretty enjoyable to watch. You an check out the full play through below.

Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin tends to have darker themes than its other counterparts. This is an action focused role-playing game developed by Team Ninja, and published by Square Enix. The game stands as an alternate universe prequel of the original Final Fantasy that released back in December of 1987.

The story line follows a cast of characters brought into a fantasy world to face down something known as “chaos” and features something of a twist for an ending. Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin was released in March 2022 for plenty of platforms. You can play it on WindowsPlayStation 4, PlayStation 5 and the Xbox One. In a small way it’s kind of like the Dark Souls of Final Fantasy games, with a darker feel to the story. There’s some real grit here, and it’s worth at least a watch, if not a play-through of your own.

As always beyond the playlist there’s more information about the game below. We hope you enjoy it!

Kresh Plays: Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin

Want to watch the full playlist on YouTube instead? Click here.

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

Part 6 (Final)

As I said above, Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin is an action focused role-playing game. That means it’s a little more fast paced than your typical fantasy style story. There is fall damage too, a fact we learned much too late and hilarity ensued.

In any case, players will take on the role of our main protagonist, Jack. You’ll be exploring environments and fighting monsters and visiting locations based upon the main titles of the Final Fantasy series. From the ever famous Tonberries and Crawlers, to spiders and bats if you’ve played Final Fantasy games before the callbacks are endless. You’ll traverse new areas inspired by the series classics and there’s a little something for everyone.

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Combat takes place in real-time, with Jack being able to switch between jobs. Once again, if you’re a Final Fantasy fan, there’s a lot to like here. For those unaware, though, some jobs do physical damage. Others heal or do magical attacks. You can also do a finishing move that violently and crystallizes the enemy. Doing that causes them to explode with volatile intent, but its worth doing.

The boss fights are pretty decent, Team Ninja did a very good job subverting my personal expectations. As a long time Final Fantasy fan myself, I’d expect to see one area boss only to find out that Kresh would be facing down something entirely different.

I made a post earlier about the “bad writing” regarding the game. I do still stick by that. The story line has a lot of lazy or skipped-over elements. More on that in the blog post. The main takeaway is that if you’re expecting a Final Fantasy level epic saga, you won’t find it here.

According to Kresh the gameplay is solid and I enjoyed watching her play it. As much as I give it beef for its bad story telling, it’s not that awful. Actually, in the last hour and a half or two, the game really ramps up and gets very good in the story telling department.

I do think that ultimately if you’re looking for an action packed adventure you’ll probably find it here. There’s a lot of really neat little additions, cool nods to the wider series, and revisiting some of those old locations in a new light is pretty nice.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you next time.

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Meanwhile, check out some of our other great content below. You can also find more information about supporting us at the bottom of this post.

With your contributions, you make our efforts possible. Thank you for supporting our content. Patreon supporters receive access into our official Discord server, and a few other perks depending on the tier. If you don’t care for Patreon, and don’t care about perks, you can always support us through PayPal too… links below.

Those who join via Patreon get special perks, such as extra content, quicker updates, and more.

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To Our Supporters

Thank you for helping us to enrich our content.

Patreon Supporters:
($3) Little Ferrets: None
($5) Demented Minions: Francis Murphy and Andrew Wheal.
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($50) Round Table Ferret/Fluffy Ferret: Josh Sayer

Resident Evil – Long Play (Jill)

Anyone who knows me knows for a fact that I love the Resident Evil franchise. I think that the games are some of the best that survival horror has to offer.

Today’s long play starts where it all began, Resident Evil for the PlayStation, in 1996. Alpha Team members are headed for the mountains northwest of Raccoon City. With missing Bravo Team members to locate, and a diabolical pharmaceutical company performing twisted experiments, it’s sure to be a nightmare.

This particular long play showcases Jill’s scenario.

Resident Evil (Jill) Long Play

I really do love this game, flaws and all. Let’s be honest, though. There are a lot of flaws with this old title these days, especially now that we have remakes and also a remastering to compare it to. By today’s standards the game is as campy as it is dated. It isn’t exactly ideal, but it is a historical icon in gaming. That’s not something anyone can dispute and for me, that’s reason enough to play it.

Resident Evil Retrospective Review

Resident Evil features a fairly typical story. A rescue mission is taking place. With a string of murders running rampant across the fictional Raccoon City, it’s up to the police to find out what is really going on. In response to this, the Special Tactics and Rescue Service, or “S.T.A.R.S.” have been sent to look into the issue. Having been sent deep into the mountains, the first team has gone missing.

Tank controls and limited ammo supply is the name of the game here. The antiquated graphics leave much to be desired, and don’t even get me started on the voice acting.

Still, there’s an old world sort of charm to the original Resident Evil, and if you’re a fan of the horror medium, it’s worth a look if you haven’t played it already.

I’ve already done a full retrospective review of the game, so go ahead and give it a read if that interests you. There’s also a properly edited video of the script if that’s to your interest instead.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest, and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll catch you next time. Meanwhile, check out some of our other great content below.

With your contributions, you make our efforts possible. Thank you for supporting our content. Patreon supporters receive access into our official Discord server, and a few other perks depending on the tier. If you don’t care for Patreon, and don’t care about perks, you can always support us through PayPal too… links below.

Those who join via Patreon get special perks, such as extra content, quicker updates, early fiction chapters and more.

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To Our Supporters

Thank you for helping us to enrich our content.

Patreon Supporters:
($3) Little Ferrets: None
($5) Demented Minions: Francis Murphy and Andrew Wheal.
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($14) True Blue Ferret: None.
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($50) Round Table Ferret/Fluffy Ferret: Josh Sayer

Spyro the Dragon – Long Play

As you probably know, we’ve started doing “no microphone, long plays” of video games over on our YouTube channel. Spyro was one of the first ones we did.

Spyro the Dragon: Reignited Trilogy released for the PlayStation 4 and  the Xbox One on November 13th, 2018. It later received a release on the PC and the Nintendo Switch on September 3rd, 2019.

This trilogy is a remastering of the original Spyro trilogy developed by Insomniac Games. The original three games ran from the years 1998 to 2000. These games are platformers featuring the protagonist, Spyro. He’s a young purple dragon with a little bit of an attitude, and a flair for breathing fire, and flying around.

Basically these games are everything you’d come to expect from a platforming title of the early 3D era. From colorful worlds to explore, laughable antagonists and the somewhat snarky personality of Spyro himself, you’ll come to find that that these games are a product of their era in gaming.

Spyro the Dragon: Reignited (Longplay)

While I wouldn’t say that the trilogy brought a new breath of life into the gameplay experience, it did at least manage to make the series accessible to a new generation of gamers around the world. Even as a remaster, the first game is just a little clunky by today’s standards. There’s no disputing that. Even so, the relatively low level of difficulty makes Spyro the Dragon a solid choice for parents with younger kids interested in gaming.

In the first game, you’ll rescue Spyro’s fellow dragons and recover all of their stolen treasure. You’ll also face up against Gnasty Gnorc, the game’s primary protagonist. If you like early 3D platformers, you’ll probably like this reignited version of Spyro the Dragon.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest, and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll catch you next time. Meanwhile, check out some of our other great content below.

With your contributions, you make our efforts possible. Thank you for supporting our content. Patreon supporters receive access into our official Discord server, and a few other perks depending on the tier. If you don’t care for Patreon, and don’t care about perks, you can always support us through PayPal too… links below.

Those who join via Patreon get special perks, such as extra content, quicker updates, early fiction chapters and more.

Click to Donate

To Our Supporters

Thank you for helping us to enrich our content.

Patreon Supporters:
($3) Little Ferrets: None
($5) Demented Minions: Francis Murphy and Andrew Wheal.
($7) Fandom Ferret: None
($14) True Blue Ferret: None.
($25) Premium Ferret: None.
($50) Round Table Ferret/Fluffy Ferret: Josh Sayer

Kern Plays: Dinner with an Owl

Hey everyone, it’s Kern here! Good games sometimes come in small packages, often times when you least expect it. That’s what happened to me when I played a game called Dinner with an Owl.

It was a game I streamed live on Twitch late at night, long after Kresh was asleep. It is also now up on YouTube.

To be honest, I wasn’t exactly sure what I was getting into with this thing, as the description only says this: Break the puzzling spell of your eccentric host! Dinner with an Owl: A short surreal point and click adventure.”

Kern Plays: Dinner with an Owl

Kern’s “let’s play” footage of Dinner with an Owl. This game was played in one sitting, as it is very short.

Part 1 of 1 (Watch on YouTube)

The game is exactly as it says it is, really. This game is short, and the puzzle itself is actually quite interesting. In retrospect, it was actually easy to solve, hiding in plain sight, but that’s what gave me such great difficulty.

The game is certainly “spoopy” instead of truly spooky or frightening in any way. Although it did catch me by surprise a few times, though not in a “jump scare” kind of way. It was more like a “Well, I wasn’t expecting that!” sort of way.

I’ll say this though, I doubt this is the sort of game anyone would want to play or watch more than once. If you’d like to experience the game yourself, go and do that instead of watching anyone play it, myself included.

Don’t worry about barriers to entry, there really isn’t any that I can think of. If you have a computer that’s even remotely functional, this game shouldn’t give you any issues. It’s free and you can get it over on Steam, so the price is right too.

More Information

If you like slightly grim point and click puzzle games, this one is worth a look. What we have here is strictly that. Dinner with an Owl is a point and click adventure game with surreal and grim undertones. The somewhat “Spoopy” part of the game lingers within the confines of the narrative.

Originally, this game was part of a game jam in 2017. On May 18, 2021, the enhanced “Dessert Edition” was released on steam. This is the version is the one that you see me playing in the video above.

Dinner with an Owl is compelling to say the least, because it isn’t overly complex, but it isn’t mindlessly simple. It stands in a strange in-between. The graphics aren’t god awful, and fit the over all design of the game well enough to get by without complaint. The soundtrack has its own original lyrical song as well, and that’s something noteworthy for an entirely free title like this one.

The voice acting isn’t half bad either. It is certainly good enough not to be earsplitting or absolutely awful. To be honest, I actually found some of the voices to be perfectly fitting, notably the owl himself.

If I had one gripe, it’s the repetitive nature of the game itself when it comes to dialogue options, though since this game was originally a game jam project made by BoringSuburbanDad you can hardly fault the project for being lacking in that single aspect. This likely wouldn’t be as annoying of an issue if I had figured out the puzzle far earlier than I did.

I wasn’t expecting it to be so straightforward, and that’s what gave me such great difficulty. All-in-all, this is a compelling little game, all things considered. For what it is, I found it enjoyable, and the price was right too.

This has been Kernook of “The Demented Ferrets”, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. Be sure to check out our other great content down below.

I’ll see you next time.

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May Mega Update Post

Hi everyone, Kern here. Well, it’s May. The month of April was super stressful, with lots of things going on behind the scenes, but the month has passed us by, and now it’s time to dig into what’s happening for the month of May.

First of all, as you know we’ve switched time slots for Saturday. We didn’t get to really test it out because Kresh was sick on Saturday, so I pulled a later night stream as a result. Next week we will both try to be there with bells on. If not, i’ll do another late night stream again.

Late Night Jurassic World Evolution and The Tenants streams are what’s keeping me occupied the most. Tuesdays contain Final Fantasy XI content, and Wednesdays and Saturdays really depend on what game we happen to be playing.

So with all of that said, let’s get into what you can expect for content for the month ahead.

Live Streaming Content:

  • Random casual late night streams (FFXI, Simulators, whatever Kern feels like)
  • Tuesdays: Primarily FFXI content.
  • Wednesdays: Whatever Kern happens to be playing, with Kresh on co-comm.
  • Saturday: Whatever Kresh happens to be playing, with Kern on co-comm.

We had a lot of real setbacks last month that prevented us from performing at our fullest potential. It wasn’t that we didn’t want to be around more often at our usual times, it was that we couldn’t.

Kresh had some minor surgery that prevented headset wearing for a while. We tested out different set-ups for audio, but none of them sufficed to our liking on such sort notice. That and the simple fact that Kresh needed to recover put us in a tough situation for streaming reguarly like we wanted.

In the meantime, my mother (Reminder: Kern here) has been in and out of several doctors appointments on a weekly basis. If you’ve been around the streams or seen a few of my previous blogs on the subject, you know that her health is an ongoing uphill battle, and has been since last November. With blood transfusions taking place for her every Wednesday for the past 3 weeks, it’s been a bit of a mess, and one that my family is still sorting out.

Hopefully my late night streaming has provided adequate content for my absence. I’m doing the absolute best that I can.

YouTube Video Content:

The struggle is real here. You may notice that there is more gameplay content than edited videos. That’s because edited content takes so long to make. We are doing our absolute best though, you can be sure of that. 

Later this week the RWBY White Trailer Review will be released (with the included blog post here, as you can expect). Hopefully you’ll enjoy it.  I really hope you do.

Other content planned comes in the form of more Kern’s Collections, and a new segment is also coming called “Kern’s Character Spotlight”. I have high hopes that you will come to enjoy these segments as we continue to work on getting them out. 

The Blog:

The meat and potatoes of this post for all of you can be found here, because this is the blog. As usual our blog stands as our most diverse and robust section of content we offer, with all sorts of things to be had.

The video format of Kern’s Collections, reviews, and analysis come accompanied with the written script here. When the Character Spotlights videos come out, they will be treated the same way. 

On top of anime, gaming and fandom related content there are other bits and pieces here too, and I hope our website will only continue to grow in number as time marches on.

Written reviews in the works for gaming Include Resident Evil 3: Nemesis (the 90’s one). Once I’m finished with that, I’ll move away to a few non-horror rated titles for a while. I’m not sure what yet, but something. I have a few outlines, but nothing I’m ready to announce.

For anime, I’m working on a Claymore review.

Kern’s Collections posts upcoming in the process include Emma: A Victorian Romance and we’re still trying to sort out the Death Note video so that it can accompany the blog.

Character Spotlight outlines are still being worked on, but you’ll see the first one this month if all goes well.

Artwork/Other:

We have Ruka hard at work designing some stream cards and other things when Ruka isn’t helping me with video content. There isn’t much to say here except that artwork is in fact being worked on.

In Closing:

All in all, we’re all hard at work doing our best to provide you with the content we can, in the way best we can. It’s a bit rocky, no one can deny that, but we are doing our best to provide you guys wonderful entertainment, and we hope you enjoy it.

This has been Kernook of “The Demented Ferrets”, where stupidity is at its finest, and level grinds are par for the course. See you all next time.

Kern’s RWBY Red Trailer Analysis

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Opening

The RWBY series toes a fine line between wonderful storytelling and awful storytelling. The world of Remnant is both unfathomably deep, and yet contemptibly shallow.

There’s a lot to unpack in the entire series. Some things are up to personal opinion, and others are vague enough to spark discourse even years down the line. This is my analysis of the series.

I’ll be honest, the RWBY series has flaws. The volumes can be clunky and inconsistent. It isn’t perfect, but I look at RWBY now as a diamond in the rough. So, let’s look back on what sparked this exciting hype-train so long ago.

From here on out I’ll be speaking as if you’ve watched the trailer and that you have at least surface level knowledge of the series. If you don’t have those two things under your belt, you really should watch at least the trailers and Volume 1 before you come back to read this post. You can watch it on the Rooster Teeth website.

At the time of this blog post, RWBY Volume 8 is in full swing. Volume 9 has been announced. However, I am going to be starting where it all began. The RWBY Red Trailer

Let me make one thing absolutely clear…

The RWBY Red Trailer does strictly what it sets out to do. It introduces us to Ruby Rose, a young huntress-in-training. In that regard it stands out with flying colors. With that said, let’s dive deeper.

Subtle Clues of Ruby’s Character

There are subtle hints to plot elements that were carefully woven into all of the trailers. Each one piggy-backs off the others in some way. This is a moment of great storytelling, showcased perfectly thanks to Ruby’s introductory song. This is my highest praise for the trailer. “Red Like Roses” is a lyrical masterpiece. It compliments everything about Ruby, from her disposition to her attire.

“Red Like Roses” flows perfectly with the scene as it unfolds. However, that’s not the only thing that makes this trailer so powerful.

Doleful tones carry gently as Ruby stands over her mother’s grave. Religion seems largely forgotten about in the series, but Ruby wears crosses that lay at an angle. Crosses like these are common in Christianity. The cross is known as a Missionary Cross.

Now this is important, as it signifies Ruby Rose as a missionary. While I doubt Christianity holds any real sway over the series, the intent of hunters could be seen as a spiritual endeavor. Something personal and deeply meaningful to that person.

Sanding over a gravestone, and carrying the symbology Ruby does, it’s hard not to see the similarities.

Particularly since when her hood is up, it looks as though she’s praying, or at least invoking the image of spirituality in some way. Think a nun, or the Virgin Mary herself.

In various christian faiths going on a missions is often a charitable thing. It’s all about crossing divides and spreading some sort of message onto others. Those are two things Ruby does in the series, although it has little to do with religion.

Ruby stands by her personal beliefs. She exhibits the desire to share them with others. She wants the world to be a better place, and voices that several times throughout the series. Furthermore, she believes that huntsmen and huntresses are intrinsically endowed with the means to do so. That to a degree, they must do so.

Now, in the series we see more often than not that huntsmen are not always altruistic people. However, that said, Ruby believes they should be.

This almost biblical imagery combined with the song, sets a strong tone that carries through the rest of the trailer and all through the volumes of the series.

As for the fight with the Beowolves, I appreciate it far more after watching the series. In the trailer, initially Ruby comes off as an overpowered little girl. Seeing the fight now, I can truly appreciate Ruby’s drive and her cunning. This mixed with the religious symbology makes for complex character.

She’s an expert in tactical combat for her age, showcased wonderfully in her fight with the beowolves. However, this is also a credit of her character design. Wars have been fought purely based on ideology since the beginning of time, and in the series this holds true as well. The show is full to bursting with Ideological conflict, and Ruby’s viewpoint is challenged time and time again as the series progresses. In later volumes, it’s challenged to the point she actually goes against her own morals on occasion. Particularly in volumes 7 and 8.

Also, as far as this trailer is concerned, hindsight is 20/20. Now that I’ve watched the series, I know she’s not overpowered. Far from it. She’s actually fairly weak in many ways that almost cripple her in the early volumes. Particularly, her social skills are completely lacking at the start of Volume 1. Her skill in combat is what earns her the respect of others when her awkwardness, and failure to spread her personal message doesn’t.

The Lyrical Symbolism

The opening lyrics go like this: “Red like roses fill my dreams and brings me to the place you rest. White is cold and always yearning. Burdened by a royal test. Black the beast descends from shadows. Yellow beauty burns… Gold.”

What I’d like to point out is that while these lyrics take nods to the main four girls, they also all apply to the way Ruby sees the world.

Now she’s just a young teenager at the start of this series.

About fifteen years old, and due to this the lyrics are simplistic. This mirrors the way she treats her teammates in Volume 1, and the conflicts she will ultimately have to face throughout the volume.

Weiss is cold by her nature at first, and always striving to be the best.

Failure isn’t an option for Weiss, and she treats Ruby like a naive child for a strong majority of Volume 1. Even when she’s being nice to Ruby, it’s the same sort of niceness you’d give to a child. Probably a young one that says things without knowing any better. It isn’t until Volume 2 that Weiss truly begins to see Ruby as an intellectual equal, instead of a child.

Blake is a shadow that looms over Ruby. A person she can’t understand or even get close to.

Every time Ruby attempts to reach out, Blake keeps her distance. This culminates in the final conflict of Volume 1, where Blake is so far out of her reach, that Ruby’s own voice gets lost between her teammates. While Blake runs off and Weiss is quick to anger, the burden to keep her team together falls on Ruby’s shoulders. She doesn’t handle it very well at all, requiring Yang to mollify Weiss.

Yellow beauty is a nod to Yang, Ruby’s older sibling. In the series, Ruby idolizes her at first.

Yang’s popular, has a lot of friends, she is more mature and she’s beautiful. As a younger sibling, Ruby has a lot to live up to. The nods to Summer Rose are certainly prevalent in the song, but the nods to Yang are too.

Entering into Beacon Academy, is terrifying for Ruby. As much as it’s her dream to be a huntress, it’s not her dream to be a team leader. It’s not her dream to be in the spotlight, and it’s not her dream to hold all of that immense responsibility on her shoulders.

All Ruby wants to do is help people… nodding back to the religious symbolism and missionary work, the message that Ruby truly wants to spread becomes difficult for her to talk about in Volume 1. This showcases in the “Black and White” arc. Team unity, helping others, and finding her own place as a “normal girl, with normal knees”. All of that truly takes a back seat to being a team leader. All of this is buried deep in the subtext of the lyrics, and it is truly masterful.

Now on a quick nod to the Grimm:

Let’s talk about the early Beowolf design. I actually like this design better than the show’s counterpart. They look feral and vicious, something to truly be intimidated by. I think the different design we received in Volume 1 was good, but this one is just better in my opinion.

Take notice, they have bloody looking mouths and eyes. They have a shadowy coat and wispy looking claws.

It seems as though they are truly creatures spawned by the depths of hell itself. 

With Grimm looking like this, it fits the lyrics better in my opinion. The implication is that it is her dream to become a huntress. Their red mouths and eyes are a nightmare. They fill her dreams with that nightmare, and the only way to be at peace with herself is to become a slayer of those nightmares, the creatures of Grimm.

Meanwhile, The Volume 1 Beowolves are plated with bone and white claws. There’s nothing wrong with them, they just look more like an animal and less like a hellspawn.

That’s the point I take from the song personally. Without the context of Grimm design “Red like roses” sounds like Ruby’s focused on the horrors of blood and carnage. While it is still completely serviceable to utilize the song that way, the lyrics lose some of their poetic charm under that new lens.

There isn’t much more for me to say about the RWBY Red Trailer. I can’t compliment it more without digging into Ruby’s character. Since this is just supposed to cover her trailer, I’ll have to refrain for now. I have plenty to say about her, but, that will need to wait until I cover the RWBY volumes properly.

All in all, the RWBY Red Trailer is a foundational touch-stone of the series. It’s helped to shape the fandom that we know today. It gave us our first tastes of RWBY as a series, and Ruby Rose the character.

 At first, we fans didn’t know quite what to expect, and that alone held our collective interests. Since the series is still ongoing, and it hasn’t died a slow death yet, I’ll let that impressive accomplishment speak for itself.

In the next analysis I’m going to cover the RWBY White Trailer

 Do you want more content until then? Well, Kreshenne and I have a Twitch account. We stream games every Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday. We also have a Twitter account and a blog. There are links in the description. Please check them out, and don’t forget to like and subscribe.

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This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you next time.

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Fandom: Little Moments Matter Most


Video Production of This Script

This is the finished video regarding the script. It is written, edited, and read aloud by Kernook of “The Demented Ferrets”. You can watch the video on this blog and on YouTube. I hope you enjoy the content.

Minako and Rei from Sailor Moon are without a doubt a solid character pairing, even if they aren’t exactly cannon across all of the Sailor Moon media. Why do they stand the test of time? Simple, because their romance comes natural to those who see it within the subtext.

In popular media, when I think of reasons to sail any ship, it’s not the large cannon elements that come to mind. It’s the tiny things. Moments when characters might brush their fingers together when exchanging an object. Times when short quips and witty dialogue carrying a greater subtext within a scene.

Know what other ships sails really well because of this? Pretty much any ship containing at least two of the main four girls of RWBY. I ship nearly every combination because of how versatile they are.

Small moments make a ship, that’s a fact. It is particularly important if a series isn’t centrally focused on romance. Then the smaller moments matter even more. Long running series with advancing story arcs might not spend a whole lot of time focusing on romantic overtures. Instead, they tend to spread large romantic elements few and far between. Sometimes, the best ships don’t have any big moments at all. Sometimes they only have a series of small elements to craft a greater narrative. In this instance, subtext quickly becomes fan fodder.

I look no further than NCIS as an example. Tony and Ziva, or “Tiva” as the ship is named by the fans. These two are strong contenders in shipping because the slow burn is as hilarious as it is dramatic.

Romance between these two is the show in spades, but, it walks a fine line. The pairing never consumes the show. Instead, the fans consume the romance, looking for the little details hidden between the subtle character interactions. These two aren’t obviously a cannon couple until much later in the series. However, this didn’t stop fans from sailing that ship early on. It was only through implication and subtext that the relationship held any ground, at least, at first.

I think that personally this is sometimes the better approach. Fans have a gift for running away with subtext. Collective fans like making stories of their own. When moments are rare,it’s no surprise that fan-fiction itself becomes a selfish endeavor.

Fans meet their own desire to see character romance carried further than a series could have taken it. This is true for almost all media that has an active fan following.

Depending on the character pairing, strange ships sail fast. I think of the romantic pairing of Elsa and Anna from Frozen being a prime example of fandom running amok. Seriously, fans ship these two hard. I don’t see the draw in it personally, but it’s in the fandom for sure.

There is no conceivable way that Disney would have imagined their older fan base deciding to turn the sisters into lesbians…

Or that, even if they were on the GRSM spectrum, that they would ever be seen as romantically in love with each other. Then again, I can’t say that I’m surprised. Pairings revolving around sibling romance can be common in fandom, particularly of the animated variety.

Even without sibling romance, some stories become downright filthy as fans of a medium carefully craft and contort romantic relationships between characters. Ultimately, for better and for worse, fans have always been able to fill gaps that cannon material fails to provide. If little else, fan communities keep character romances thriving when long stretches of time pass without cannon material.

This is particularly important when large series take an extended break or the series eventually ends. At that point it’s up to fans to find a new source of entertainment. Some find this solace within the media that they already care for, writing or reading stories that reflect on certain plot elements within the series as a whole.

Deceased or retired characters in media find new life, and new stories because fan fiction and far art too. I think of characters like Pyrrha Nikos from RWBY, or Kate Todd and Ziva David from NCIS, as prime examples of characters that continue to live on in fandom because of the stories people write.

Without these stories, these characters, and their ships, they might have been left stagnant and forgotten. Within fandom, these characters will always live on. They will always be shipped, and the fandom will always triumph.

That’s what little moments do. They’re powerful, and they can’t be disregarded.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you next time.

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Resident Evil Retrospective Review

Hey guys, it’s Kernook here. Let’s enter into the realm of survival horror for a spell, shall we? This will be a retrospective review of Resident Evil. This review will only cover the original black box release of Resident Evil 1, for the PlayStation.

Resident Evil Review – Video Format

This review will not cover the directors cut, or the duel shock release of the game. That’s for two reasons. Firstly, the soundtrack was changed in both of those versions, and not entirely for the better. Secondly, even though I do have both the director’s cut and the original black box release, I usually don’t play the director’s cut version.

Furthermore, this review does not cover the Resident Evil remake. That’s a topic for a different day. It requires it’s own separate review. Today, I’m just going to be covering the original game. There’s a lot to cover here, so let’s get started.

Resident Evil as a franchise will always be very near and dear to my heart. In order to understand why, I need to give you a glimpse of my childhood. My personal upbringing with gaming isn’t necessarily something that should be emulated.

In 1989, I was born with Dyspraxia and Dysgraphia, which are non-curable motor-skill disorders. They’re also kind of weird, and when I was a child there was no good way to handle the disorders. Experts in the field of medicine sort of just shrugged it off. They weren’t entirely sure how to help alleviate the symptoms, which are a long list in and of themselves. Look it up if you want to, just know that not all of them apply to everyone. There is a spectrum.

What worked for me, probably as a fluke was incredibly lucky. I just want to make that clear. I don’t advocate for buying games for children who aren’t ready to handle the context of that game. Furthermore, I believe it’s up to parents to police their child’s gaming habits. It’s not for the media or the public to decide.

That being said, as a child I spent a lot of my time playing video games. I belonged to a family of gamers. My earliest memories contain eight-bit and sixteen-bit images splashed across the television screen. Sonic and Mario were my bread and butter. We were lucky to have a Sega Genesis, a Nintendo, and a Super Nintendo in the house.

Our gaming library wasn’t particularly vast. Thankfully, we had a large and active gaming family. My bother, older cousins, and even my mom, played video games. We often traded games and systems, to experience the best of all worlds. The medium of gaming was everywhere for me.

When I think about it now, playing the Resident Evil franchise in the late 90’s was one of the best experiences I could have had as a child. It helped a lot for my personal and particular problems. So, from here on out, when I talk about the franchise, just keep that. I do have a positive personal bias towards the franchise as a whole, and I won’t disregard that.

The Beginning: Sweet Home Mutates into Resident Evil

Any gamer that was around for the 90’s knows that it was a very experimental time in gaming history. Prior to the 90’s, playing games with 3D animation was laughable, expensive, and to casual players it was unheard of.

Frankly, 2D gaming was cheaper to develop, more accessible to gamers, and pandered to a wider family-style audience. In general, 2D gaming was just the commonality at the time. Occasionally computers offered a stepping stone into 3D gaming, but even that was limited at first. A lot of games that looked 3D weren’t. They just looked that way, using clever techniques and tricks of the eye.

Sony changed that with the release of the PlayStation. The powerhouse of a system opened doors for developers, and allowed gamers a glimpse into what fully realized worlds might look like.

Capcom, a Japanese video-game developer, had the bold idea of bringing one of their classic games over to the new console. Its name was “Sweet Home“. Now, here’s a little food for thought. Sweet Home was a title for the family entertainment system. It was made in 1989, so everything about it was made with the older platform in mind. Bringing it into a 3D space was going to be a monumental effort. The game was a fusion, containing both RPG and horror elements. Knowing that this would not be an easy task, Capcom asked Shinji Mikami to help them with the project.

To say that the project was a massive undertaking would be selling the matter short. Everything was against them in this effort. Sweet Home was a complex game with multiple story lines, and very intricately created puzzles. They couldn’t just up-heave the general concept, and then proceed to cram it into a 3D environment.

That surely would have been a complete disaster. Thankfully, that’s not what they did.

Instead, the ideas and themes of Sweet Home took on a life of their own. Eventually, from the ashes of all of those great ideas, a new game was born. It was known as Bio Hazard in Japan.

Unfortunately, there was another problem. They couldn’t use the name. A DOS game had already registered that name for a different brand, so Capcom couldn’t use it.

Capcom eventually re-named the title, and it became Resident Evil. The game, in a word, was masterful. There were plenty of horror games to play at the time, but none of them were quite like this one. With the release of Resident Evil, so too, came the birth of survival horror.

An Aside: A Plethora of “You Died” Screens

I was young when I began my Resident Evil journey. The first game I ever beat on my own was Resident Evil 3: Nemesis. Prior to that, I didn’t have the skills required to beat the games. I tried, of course, but I always needed help. Resident Evil 3: Nemesis had a freakishly low skill requirement on easy mode.

With tons of weapons and ammo in the item box at the start of the game, it’s actually pretty difficult to die. Well, I mean, unless you just stand there and let zombies eat you.

As a general rule, survival horror is not an easy genre to play. It’s generally made for adults. It’s not aimed at it kids, nor should it be. I played the genre as a child, but I had an older brother that was usually with me. Forcing myself to focus on cognitive puzzle solving, basic game controls, memorizing maps, and recalling enemy layouts were some of the hardest things I ever had to do in a game. This is why I say that playing these games helped me more than I ever could have perceived as a child. They were foundational tools for many of the skills I became able to do after holding a controller and thinking outside of the box.

After playing Resident Evil 3: Nemesis on easy, normal, and finally hard difficulty, I was able to go back to the older games in the genre and play them on my own. Before that, I usually never made it beyond the mansion in Resident Evil 1, or the police station in Resident Evil 2. Before that, poor inventory management, terrible ammo conservation, and a lack of ink ribbons usually did me in.

Entering the Nightmare

Entering into Resident Evil, a bazaar string of murders runs rampant. Victims are being eaten alive.

Resident Evil features a fairly typical story. A rescue mission is taking place. With a string of murders running rampant across the fictional Raccoon City, it’s up to the police to find out what is really going on. In response to this, the Special Tactics and Rescue Service, or “S.T.A.R.S.” have been sent to look into the issue. Having been sent deep into the mountains, the first team has gone missing.

When starting the game, players get to choose between two characters. Both of them are S.T.A.R.S officers. One is a man by the name of Chris Redfield. The other is a woman by the name of Jill Valentine. Each one has their own story, and it serves the player to go through each scenario at least once.

No matter what character you pick, you have a few not-so-simple tasks:

  • First, you must find the missing Bravo S.T.A.R.S. team members. At the very least, you must find out what happened to them.
  • Secondly, you must find out what has been happening deep in the Arklay Mountains just northwest of Raccoon City.
  • Thirdly, you have to survive this ordeal and come out of it alive.

The opening cinematic is the same for both characters. You find out that the other team’s helicopter has been heavily damaged, and no one is around. A pack of deranged zombie dogs attack the group. In a desperate attempt to survive the attack, the alpha team members make a mad dash to the nearby mansion. They hide inside, where they believe it will be safe.

Instead, they’ve walked headlong into the nightmare. The a virus has spread throughout the entire mansion, infecting everything from humans, dogs, plants, spiders, and more.

The Basics

The mansion itself is a labyrinth of narrow hallways. A maze that needs to be traversed bit by bit, carefully and with an eye out for the looming dangers.

Tight camera angles and tank controls keep the player on their toes. Now, I’ll say this, a lot of people complain about tank controls. In this current era of gaming, I agree they can be a bit clunky. That said, I never had an issue with them. In fact, they were almost second nature to me. For me, I had more of a problem with inventory management and trying not to use up all my ammo.

The game-takes small cues from Sweet Home, Alone in the Dark, and other story driven horror titles. With limited inventory and never enough ammo, players will be forced to explore many areas to find the items they need in order to progress.

Certain keys have to be acquired, and backtracking will happen more than once. This was a risky design decision, but I’m glad it works so well. Typewriters for saving and item boxes for inventory management will be utilized often. They have been carefully placed in areas that players visit often.

On the topic of item boxes and typewriters, they are instrumental in playing Resident Evil. These are core game mechanics across most of the titles. Space on your character is limited, and it is imperative that you plan accordingly. This includes saving your game. In order to save your game, you require ink ribbons. You’ll usually find them in small batches.

Every time you save your game, it costs an ink ribbon. The supply is limited and on the first play-through you might find yourself running out. The ink ribbon is a doubled edged sword, though. Higher end game rankings require faster completion times, fewer saves, and less healing items.

Thanks to constant puzzle solving, there is a sense of adventure woven into the narrative. To be honest, it couples nicely with the campy dialogue and nods to classic horror as a genre.

Nowadays, the original Resident Evil might be a bit too campy, but I still enjoy it. I think it works well, given the graphics of the era.

Newcomers need to remember that the PlayStation era was before high fidelity graphics were even possible in gaming. In my opinion, the goofy dialogue only adds to the charm. In some ways, it has even helped to age the game. Back in the day there were some parts of the game I had a hard time taking seriously. Nowadays, I think it’s actually impossible. I feel like everyone has that moment when they want to laugh out loud at least once. For me, that reason alone makes it an experience worth playing.

The Combat

Really, there is only one form of combat in Resident Evil. You can either aim your gun and shoot, or choose to run away. Both options have their place, and it’s important to know what option suits the situation best.

Skilled players can do no “save, knife only runs”, but that isn’t something average players will master. Certainly not on their first try.

Learning the contours of the mansion will help you to make these all too important decisions. You can’t murder every enemy in the entire game. Your ammo is limited, and this key fact is what defines the survival horror genre. Well, that, and the tank controls for earlier titles.

Your job is simply to survive by any means necessary. Choosing a live-and-let-live approach comes in handy inside wide open rooms. Outmaneuvering slower enemies will conserve ammunition. Narrow hallways will require a more aggressive approach.

Due to the stationary camera angles and tank controls, sometimes enemies will be hiding just off camera. The developers planned for that, giving every monster in the game some sort of audio cue. They were careful to make every sound distinct and clear against the ambient music of the soundtrack. Zombies have their moans, dogs growl, hunters make a clicking noise whenever they walk, and so on.

Even boss fights like Yawn have carefully placed cues to warn you about what kind of attack is coming. In general, careful players can usually avoid getting attacked by a monster off screen, all they need to do is wait and listen.

If you take damage from an enemy, you’ll have to rely on herbs and first aid sprays to heal you. They’re in short supply, and every time you get hit you put yourself into a sticky situation. Your character will begin to hold their side if the injury is bad enough. If they continue to take damage, they’ll begin to limp slowly, and this makes avoiding enemies difficult.

There are several boss battles, of course. Yawn is a battle you face twice. With the right weapons and preparation, they’re never too hard. If you conserve your ammo properly the bosses shouldn’t be your largest threat. In fact, I’d say that most boss battles in this game aren’t that big of a threat at all.

Instead, I’d say that forgetting where you might have left a zombie or two is a much bigger problem. Backtracking after a battle can be a death sentence. Especially if you’re low on ammo and healing items.

Final Thoughts

Resident Evil – Long Play (Jill)

Today’s long play starts where it all began, Resident Evil for the PlayStation, in 1996. Alpha Team members are headed for the mountains northwest of Raccoon City. With missing Bravo Team members to locate, and a diabolical pharmaceutical company performing twisted experiments, it is sure to be a nightmare.

The first Resident Evil game is a true classic among the survival horror genre. It isn’t insanely difficult, but it doesn’t forgive reckless new players either. The game has a learning curve, and it expects you to rise above every puzzle, enemy, and trap that it gives you.

The game is atmospheric in the best ways, utilizing visual assets in a way few games could back then. The musical sound design is flawless in the original black box edition of the game, ambient and often beautiful.

The musical quality is abysmal when it comes to the directors cut, or the duel shock releases of the game. Sadly, that’s the trade-off you make if you can’t get a copy of the original.

The voice acting is campy at best, embarrassingly bad at worst, but a lot of that dialogue became a touchstone for gamers around the world. People attend anime and gaming conventions cosplaying as the characters. Fan fiction flooded websites, and fan art followed soon after.

Best of all, nowadays speed-runners collectively band together to experience the game, giving rise to an entirely new audience of survival horror fans. All of that cannot be understated.

Obviously, with the original game being remade, we got to visit the mansion once more with the Resident Evil remake for the GameCube in 2002. Many prefer the remake over the original. I certainly do as well. The remake eventually received a PC port, which is by far the most visually impressive way to enjoy the game.

That said, returning to the original game every now and then is vastly important to gaming history. Survival horror as a genre would be completely different than it is today without the original Resident Evil.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest, and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll catch you next time. Meanwhile, check out some of our other great content below.

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